“Know Where to ‘TURN’ When Deploying WebRTC,” by Erik Lagerway

Co-founder Erik Lagerway guest posts on No Jitter, discussing the 20% call failure rate of WebRTC calls.

Network address translation (NAT) has long been the bane of VoIP services, since it changes the IP addresses and ports that VoIP elements need for addressing. In the meantime, some firewalls outright block certain kinds of traffic in the interest of security. But NAT traversal and media relay products allow VoIP and WebRTC packets to pass through the majority of enterprise firewalls.In simple terms, this means a user can connect and hear what the person at the other end is saying.

Read Erik’s comments on how to correct for this issue with Relay First here.

Hookflash announces Relay First Real Time Communications Platform for enterprise at Microsoft Edge Developer Summit

Hookflash co-founder, Chief Product Officer, Erik Lagerway and Bernard Aboba, Principal Architect, Skype, Microsoft, present Real-Time Communications with Microsoft Edge at Edge Developer Summit, San Francisco. Microsoft new Edge browser in Windows 10 now has over 150 million monthly active devices.

Modern browsers are rapidly converging on a set of standardized APIs for plugin-free, interoperable real-time communications. This session will cover development of real-time communications applications for the web and mobile devices using Microsoft Edge as well as open source libraries to enable interoperability across platforms and mobile devices.

Hookflash intro from Bernard Aboba of Microsoft begins at 25 minute mark. View the video here.

Enterprise Connect: WebRTC Standards Update

Enterprise Connect: WebRTC Standards Update

 

Hookflash CEO – Trent Johnsen, will be on a panel at Enterprise Connect on March 16 at 11am with some of the current WebRTC 1.0 specification editors discussing the road to WebRTC availability.

WebRTC Standards Update: When Will WebRTC Become Available for You?

Speaker Irwin Lazar  |  Vice President and Service Director, Nemertes Research |
Moderator Cullen Jennings, PhD  |  Cisco Fellow, RTCWeb Co-Chair at Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), Cisco |
Speaker Trent Johnsen  |  CEO, Hookflash, Inc.
Speaker Tsahi Levent-Levi  |  Founder, BlogGeek.Me
Speaker Dan Burnette  |  Founder, Standards Play
Speaker Brent Kelly, PhD  |  Principal Analyst/Consultant, KelCor, Inc.

Location:  Osceola 4
Date:  Monday, March 16
Time:  11:00am – 12:00pm
Pass Type: WebRTC Conference-Within-A-Conference, Entire Event – Get your pass now!

During this session we will hear from those directly involved with WebRTC standards development as they discuss how close we are to a truly ubiquitous ability to support WebRTC across browsers and applications. We will review where the standard is now, what work needs to be done to get to WebRTC Version 1.0, and happens afterward. We will include a discussion of the ORTC initiative.

Meet Peerly, your new Twitter messenger

Peerly

 

Yesterday, we launched Peerly, a new Twitter messenger with video chat and few other interesting mobile messaging features like offline messaging and offline call notifications. Peerly was built to show off Hookflash technology and our ability to enable real time communications for mobile developers. It’s early days still and as we release Peerly to a broader audience we will be improving the overall user experience.

Peerly leverages Hookflash, Open Peer and Twitter APIs to provide for what we think is an interesting experience in a modern mobile messenger.

To learn more about Hookflash, and how we help your organization enable real time communication features for your apps, visit us at Hookflash.com or call 1.855.HOOKFLASH (466.5352).

Mobile developers wave “goodbye” to metered minutes

Say Goodbye to Metered Minutes!!For the past 100 or so years, we have been paying for every minute spent on our phones. Metered minutes for voice have long been the standard for growth of telecoms the world over.

Early purveyors of VoIP (Voice over IP) promised great things and many have built respectable businesses. Still, we hang onto the networks of old (PSTN) which come with baggage and metered minutes remain.

We are in a “mobile first” world now, where mobile messenger applications reign supreme eg. WhatsApp, WeChat, Facebook Messenger, Snapchat etc. For good or for bad, these new chat apps are forever changing the way we think of communications. The next generation expects a certain level of service that comes for free, and that will become the new norm.

This new “free mobile communication” mantra can come at a price for providers.

Traditional VoIP networks are primarily built using client-server methodologies, which means the calls (signalling at least) and text messages pass through a server. That server must be hosted somewhere and that data transfer cost must be accounted for, somehow. More and more chat apps are supporting Voice and Video calls, the overhead involved in providing for those features on the back end is not trivial.

If there were a way to provide these features without having the calls and messages go through a server, it should be much cheaper (or free) to deliver those features to the users. P2P (peer to peer) communication services allow providers to cut costs and deliver rich communication features more affordably. We know this to be true because we have built countless VoIP networks on traditional client-server technology and also with P2P technology, in this case Open Peer.

Keep in mind a P2P-centric network does not take into consideration interoperability with the PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network), so that I can call my mom and dad for instance.  From a smartphone users perspective, this is not much of a problem. Data / wifi networks are nearly boundless.  Just ask yourself “When was the last time you weren’t connected?” As a provider, the moment we bridge P2P with PSTN, we increase our costs enormously and lose all the rich features in the process.

Is there a way we get the benefits of P2P and still interoperate with the networks of yesterday?

If you want the real benefits that a Peer-to-Peer communications network will provide, you must get past the idea of interop with the PSTN. There are plenty of providers out there who refuse or simply cannot make the move to P2P due to their business model or the like and to you I say, “Very sorry for your troubles”.

The middle ground.

Leveraging P2P in your network where it makes sense (mobile) and using gateways to negotiate to the PSTN is certainly possible and we have helped network providers do just that. This helps them to prepare for an OTT (Over The Top) model that is more P2P centric and efficient while still servicing their customer of old.

When will metered minutes truly become a thing of the past? When the carriers wake up? God help us all.

If you are a modern mobile developer working on iOS or Android, you can say “goodbye” to metered minutes today.

Next Event: @RobinRaymond of Hookflash speaking @IIT_RTC_Conf #webrtc #ortc

IIT RTC Conference

This is hands down our favorite event of the year. IIT has produced a great “no bs” technical event. If you want to know what is happening inside the industry, you will want to attend this one. Excerpt from their website..

The IIT RTC Conference and Expo is a globally recognized collaborative event, where industry and academia connect. Leveraging its unique academic setting, this annual conference brings together technical professionals and business executives from the data and telecommunications industry, standards bodies, policy and regulatory institutions, and academic educators and researchers to promote an open exchange of ideas to lead future development in the rapidly changing field of real-time communications.

Robin Raymond will be speaking on a few topics:

  • Future of the Cloud with P2P (Peer-to-Peer) RTC (Real-Time Communication)
  • ORTC (Object Real-Time Communications) API Update
  • Delivering Real-Time Communications with Mobile

IIT RTC Conference Schedule: http://www.rtc-conference.com/conference-schedule-listings/

Hookflash, Google and Microsoft lead on ORTC / WebRTC 1.1 Public Draft

webrtc1.1_logo

The first ORTC Public Draft Specification has been published, authored by Hookflash, Microsoft, and Google. (http://ortc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/ortc.html ) This specification extends WebRTC 1.0 with new functionality to create a WebRTC 1.1 API with exceptional flexibility and no loss of compatibility.

Like WebRTC, ORTC (Object Real-time Communication) enables plugin-free real-time communications for mobile, web and cloud, but is specifically tailored to provide the direct control needed to enable advanced multimedia and conferencing features.

“We heard developers say that they wanted more direct control over the technologies available in WebRTC. At the same time, we didn’t want existing developers to have to start over with a new API. ORTC is our proposal for how we can accomplish both of these things – a new set of APIs for direct control, that builds off the existing WebRTC 1.0 API set. As an evolution of the existing API, we consider this WebRTC 1.1” comments Justin Uberti, Google Tech Lead, WebRTC. “We’re grateful to Hookflash for their work to get ORTC off the ground. They have been instrumental in making this cross-industry collaboration happen, and we look forward to continuing our work with them.”

This newly published public draft has come a long way since the W3C ORTC Community Group was formed in mid-2013. As it has progressed from an initial set of ideas to a fleshed-out draft complete enough for implementations, several companies have gotten closely involved, with Microsoft and Google now joining Hookflash as authors of the emerging specification.

“We have been working hard to get the ORTC API to the point where it can be implemented. This would not have been possible without the initial and continuing work of Hookflash”, commented Bernard Aboba, Principal Architect, Skype, “We also are excited by the ORTC API’s support for advanced video features such as SVC (Scalable Video Coding) and simulcast. The Javascript Object API approach has made these advanced video technologies more accessible, which has been difficult in the past.”

The W3C ORTC Community Group now numbers more than 60 participants.

“We believe the contributions to WebRTC 1.1 / ORTC will allow web communications technology to become ubiquitous and transcend nearly all communications technologies that came before it” says Hookflash Co-founder, Erik Lagerway, “We are honored to be working with some of the brightest minds at Google, Microsoft, and the other contributing members in the ORTC CG to mature WebRTC into a universal go-to toolkit enabling communications across the globe.”

For more information on ORTC, see:
W3C ORTC Community Group
ORTC.org – History and FAQs
WebRTC.is – ORTC & WebRTC news

Hookflash enables real-time social, mobile, and web communications for integration of voice, video, messaging with federated identity into world leading software, enterprise, applications, networks, mobile and computing devices. Hookflash and Open Peer are trademarks of Hookflash Inc.

Developers can register at (http://fly.hookflash.me) to start using the Hookflash RTC service and toolkits today.

For more information on Hookflash RTC toolkits and White Labeling please visit Hookflash http://hookflash.com.

Come and work at one of the coolest companies in the space! We’re now hiring for these development positions: iOS, Android, Node.js & C++ send us your resume: jobs@hookflash.com.

Hookflash – Trent Johnsen

855-466-5352 Ext: 1