“Know Where to ‘TURN’ When Deploying WebRTC,” by Erik Lagerway

Co-founder Erik Lagerway guest posts on No Jitter, discussing the 20% call failure rate of WebRTC calls.

Network address translation (NAT) has long been the bane of VoIP services, since it changes the IP addresses and ports that VoIP elements need for addressing. In the meantime, some firewalls outright block certain kinds of traffic in the interest of security. But NAT traversal and media relay products allow VoIP and WebRTC packets to pass through the majority of enterprise firewalls.In simple terms, this means a user can connect and hear what the person at the other end is saying.

Read Erik’s comments on how to correct for this issue with Relay First here.

Hookflash announces Relay First Real Time Communications Platform for enterprise at Microsoft Edge Developer Summit

Hookflash co-founder, Chief Product Officer, Erik Lagerway and Bernard Aboba, Principal Architect, Skype, Microsoft, present Real-Time Communications with Microsoft Edge at Edge Developer Summit, San Francisco. Microsoft new Edge browser in Windows 10 now has over 150 million monthly active devices.

Modern browsers are rapidly converging on a set of standardized APIs for plugin-free, interoperable real-time communications. This session will cover development of real-time communications applications for the web and mobile devices using Microsoft Edge as well as open source libraries to enable interoperability across platforms and mobile devices.

Hookflash intro from Bernard Aboba of Microsoft begins at 25 minute mark. View the video here.

“Getting Real on RTC,” by Erik Lagerway

Co-founder Erik Lagerway guest posts on No Jitter, discussing the history and current state of WebRTC.

One company in particular rules the enterprise, and that’s Microsoft. But Microsoft supports ORTC, not WebRTC…

…what is ORTC, or as it’s formally known, Object Real-Time Communications. Back in 2013, a small team from Hookflash, with Microsoft joining shortly thereafter, formed the W3C Community Group to work on a parallel effort to WebRTC with a focus on advanced functionality via object APIs. We first pitted ORTC as an alternative to WebRTC work happening at the WebRTC working group. But now ORTC and WebRTC are converging, and the WebRTC working group already has integrated some of the ORTC APIs into the WebRTC 1.0 spec. The ORTC Community Group (CG) now boasts more than 100 members, including Google.

Read the full article here.

The State of WebRTC at Enterprise Connect in Orlando, March 7 2016

Use the conference scheduler to make sure you don’t miss the Hookflash keynote at Enterprise Connect.

After several years of WebRTC development what is the state of the standard today? Is WebRTC really bringing any new capabilities to the UC space? What is ready for use today, and what is still coming down the road? Are the video codec wars being resolved? What about the security issues that have been raised? Have they been solved? How do people develop WebRTC apps for mobile devices? During this session we’ll answer all these questions and more as we discuss the current state of WebRTC technology.

Visit the site here.

2016 WebRTC Reality Check Slated for Enterprise Connect

Irwin Lazar, Vice President and Service Director at Nemertes Research and host of the WebRTC Conference Within a Conference, introduces Hookflash as keynote:

We’ll kick off the conference on Monday, March 7, with a keynote by Hookflash executives Trent Johnsen, CEO and co-founder, and Erik Lagerway, co-founder. Trent and Erik, who both have been involved in WebRTC since its infancy, co-chair various W3C Working Groups on WebRTC.

Read the full article here.

Hookflash Keynote: “The State of WebRTC” Enterprise Connect 2016 – Monday, March 7, 2016 – Orlando, Florida.

Hookflash is proud to keynote at Enterprise Connect, the leading conference and exhibition for enterprise IP Telephony, Converged Networks and Unified Communications in North America. Enterprise Connect brings corporate IT decision makers together with the industry’s vendors, analysts and consultants to focus on the issues central to enterprise networks and communications.

After several years of WebRTC development what is the state of the standard today? What are the implications of ORTC and it’s implementation by Google and Microsoft? Is WebRTC really bringing any new capabilities to the UC space? What is ready for use today, and what is still coming down the road? Are the video codec wars being resolved? What about the security issues that have been raised? Have they been solved? How do people develop WebRTC apps for mobile devices?

During this session we’ll answer all these questions and more as we discuss the current state of WebRTC technology.

Visit the site for registration and additional information.

What Developers Should Know About ORTC Versus WebRTC

Janet Wagner, of ProgrammableWeb, provides an in-depth and insightful analysis of ORTC and compares it to WebRTC.

The key difference between the ORTC API and the WebRTC 1.0 API is that the ORTC API is a lower-level JavaScript API that provides the same components as the WebRTC 1.0 API while allowing greater flexibility than what is currently available in the WebRTC 1.0 SDP interface. Developers can use the ORTC API to implement advanced capabilities such as layered video coding, simulcast, scalable video coding (SVC), and more. These capabilities can also be implemented using SDP in WebRTC 1.0. However, WebRTC 1.0 communication capabilities can be more difficult for developers to implement. A JavaScript API like the ORTC API, provides greater access to more controls. In WebRTC 1.0, modifying the same controls would require browser source code changes. ORTC is also taking the approach of JavaScript shim libraries; for example, ORTC allows a JavaScript-based shim (“upshim”) to be built on top of ORTC.js which would provide the same functionality of WebRTC 1.0 APIs, including the RTCPeerConnection API. It should also be noted that ORTC APIs do not replace WebRTC 1.0 APIs, but rather augment the existing SDP APIs in WebRTC 1.0 which have been integrated into millions upon millions of devices.

Read the full article at ProgrammableWeb.

Hookflash, Google and Microsoft lead on ORTC / WebRTC 1.1 Public Draft

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The first ORTC Public Draft Specification has been published, authored by Hookflash, Microsoft, and Google. (http://ortc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/ortc.html ) This specification extends WebRTC 1.0 with new functionality to create a WebRTC 1.1 API with exceptional flexibility and no loss of compatibility.

Like WebRTC, ORTC (Object Real-time Communication) enables plugin-free real-time communications for mobile, web and cloud, but is specifically tailored to provide the direct control needed to enable advanced multimedia and conferencing features.

“We heard developers say that they wanted more direct control over the technologies available in WebRTC. At the same time, we didn’t want existing developers to have to start over with a new API. ORTC is our proposal for how we can accomplish both of these things – a new set of APIs for direct control, that builds off the existing WebRTC 1.0 API set. As an evolution of the existing API, we consider this WebRTC 1.1” comments Justin Uberti, Google Tech Lead, WebRTC. “We’re grateful to Hookflash for their work to get ORTC off the ground. They have been instrumental in making this cross-industry collaboration happen, and we look forward to continuing our work with them.”

This newly published public draft has come a long way since the W3C ORTC Community Group was formed in mid-2013. As it has progressed from an initial set of ideas to a fleshed-out draft complete enough for implementations, several companies have gotten closely involved, with Microsoft and Google now joining Hookflash as authors of the emerging specification.

“We have been working hard to get the ORTC API to the point where it can be implemented. This would not have been possible without the initial and continuing work of Hookflash”, commented Bernard Aboba, Principal Architect, Skype, “We also are excited by the ORTC API’s support for advanced video features such as SVC (Scalable Video Coding) and simulcast. The Javascript Object API approach has made these advanced video technologies more accessible, which has been difficult in the past.”

The W3C ORTC Community Group now numbers more than 60 participants.

“We believe the contributions to WebRTC 1.1 / ORTC will allow web communications technology to become ubiquitous and transcend nearly all communications technologies that came before it” says Hookflash Co-founder, Erik Lagerway, “We are honored to be working with some of the brightest minds at Google, Microsoft, and the other contributing members in the ORTC CG to mature WebRTC into a universal go-to toolkit enabling communications across the globe.”

For more information on ORTC, see:
W3C ORTC Community Group
ORTC.org – History and FAQs
WebRTC.is – ORTC & WebRTC news

Hookflash enables real-time social, mobile, and web communications for integration of voice, video, messaging with federated identity into world leading software, enterprise, applications, networks, mobile and computing devices. Hookflash and Open Peer are trademarks of Hookflash Inc.

Developers can register at (http://fly.hookflash.me) to start using the Hookflash RTC service and toolkits today.

For more information on Hookflash RTC toolkits and White Labeling please visit Hookflash http://hookflash.com.

Come and work at one of the coolest companies in the space! We’re now hiring for these development positions: iOS, Android, Node.js & C++ send us your resume: jobs@hookflash.com.

Hookflash – Trent Johnsen

855-466-5352 Ext: 1

Hookflash for Android – Improved RTC Video Support

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We are always working hard to improve the tools we build for our developer partners and customers. Today we are happy to announce improved support for RTC (Real-time Communications) Video.

We’ve had video for a couple of weeks now but we held off on releasing it due to some lingering issues, until today. We have knocked down a few larger bugs (video and other aspects) in the last week and there are plenty more to come.  The Hookflash android reference app now has video calling capabilities as does the Hookflash / Open Peer android SDK.

 

Android reference app can be found here
iOS reference app can be found here

Developers sign up here

Improved support for Push Notifications on iOS and Android

In this update, notifications become more fluid and work across conversations on both iOS and Android.

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Real-time messaging on mobile requires “suspended application” support for notifying the user that a new message has arrived when the application is not in focus. Receiving a message as part of a conversation is not much good unless the user is aware the message exists. The push notification allows the user to understand that the message has been received when not looking at the application at the time the message arrives. This new release makes greater use of this functionality on both Android and iOS.

Android reference app can be found here.
iOS reference app can be found here.

Developers, add real-time messaging, voice and video to your app today! Sign up for free here: http://fly.hookflash.me/