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Hookflash announces Relay First Real Time Communications Platform for enterprise at Microsoft Edge Developer Summit

Hookflash co-founder, Chief Product Officer, Erik Lagerway and Bernard Aboba, Principal Architect, Skype, Microsoft, present Real-Time Communications with Microsoft Edge at Edge Developer Summit, San Francisco. Microsoft new Edge browser in Windows 10 now has over 150 million monthly active devices.

Modern browsers are rapidly converging on a set of standardized APIs for plugin-free, interoperable real-time communications. This session will cover development of real-time communications applications for the web and mobile devices using Microsoft Edge as well as open source libraries to enable interoperability across platforms and mobile devices.

Hookflash intro from Bernard Aboba of Microsoft begins at 25 minute mark. View the video here.

Next Event: @RobinRaymond of Hookflash speaking @IIT_RTC_Conf #webrtc #ortc

IIT RTC Conference

This is hands down our favorite event of the year. IIT has produced a great “no bs” technical event. If you want to know what is happening inside the industry, you will want to attend this one. Excerpt from their website..

The IIT RTC Conference and Expo is a globally recognized collaborative event, where industry and academia connect. Leveraging its unique academic setting, this annual conference brings together technical professionals and business executives from the data and telecommunications industry, standards bodies, policy and regulatory institutions, and academic educators and researchers to promote an open exchange of ideas to lead future development in the rapidly changing field of real-time communications.

Robin Raymond will be speaking on a few topics:

  • Future of the Cloud with P2P (Peer-to-Peer) RTC (Real-Time Communication)
  • ORTC (Object Real-Time Communications) API Update
  • Delivering Real-Time Communications with Mobile

IIT RTC Conference Schedule: http://www.rtc-conference.com/conference-schedule-listings/

Hookflash, Google and Microsoft lead on ORTC / WebRTC 1.1 Public Draft

webrtc1.1_logo

The first ORTC Public Draft Specification has been published, authored by Hookflash, Microsoft, and Google. (http://ortc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/ortc.html ) This specification extends WebRTC 1.0 with new functionality to create a WebRTC 1.1 API with exceptional flexibility and no loss of compatibility.

Like WebRTC, ORTC (Object Real-time Communication) enables plugin-free real-time communications for mobile, web and cloud, but is specifically tailored to provide the direct control needed to enable advanced multimedia and conferencing features.

“We heard developers say that they wanted more direct control over the technologies available in WebRTC. At the same time, we didn’t want existing developers to have to start over with a new API. ORTC is our proposal for how we can accomplish both of these things – a new set of APIs for direct control, that builds off the existing WebRTC 1.0 API set. As an evolution of the existing API, we consider this WebRTC 1.1” comments Justin Uberti, Google Tech Lead, WebRTC. “We’re grateful to Hookflash for their work to get ORTC off the ground. They have been instrumental in making this cross-industry collaboration happen, and we look forward to continuing our work with them.”

This newly published public draft has come a long way since the W3C ORTC Community Group was formed in mid-2013. As it has progressed from an initial set of ideas to a fleshed-out draft complete enough for implementations, several companies have gotten closely involved, with Microsoft and Google now joining Hookflash as authors of the emerging specification.

“We have been working hard to get the ORTC API to the point where it can be implemented. This would not have been possible without the initial and continuing work of Hookflash”, commented Bernard Aboba, Principal Architect, Skype, “We also are excited by the ORTC API’s support for advanced video features such as SVC (Scalable Video Coding) and simulcast. The Javascript Object API approach has made these advanced video technologies more accessible, which has been difficult in the past.”

The W3C ORTC Community Group now numbers more than 60 participants.

“We believe the contributions to WebRTC 1.1 / ORTC will allow web communications technology to become ubiquitous and transcend nearly all communications technologies that came before it” says Hookflash Co-founder, Erik Lagerway, “We are honored to be working with some of the brightest minds at Google, Microsoft, and the other contributing members in the ORTC CG to mature WebRTC into a universal go-to toolkit enabling communications across the globe.”

For more information on ORTC, see:
W3C ORTC Community Group
ORTC.org – History and FAQs
WebRTC.is – ORTC & WebRTC news

Hookflash enables real-time social, mobile, and web communications for integration of voice, video, messaging with federated identity into world leading software, enterprise, applications, networks, mobile and computing devices. Hookflash and Open Peer are trademarks of Hookflash Inc.

Developers can register at (http://fly.hookflash.me) to start using the Hookflash RTC service and toolkits today.

For more information on Hookflash RTC toolkits and White Labeling please visit Hookflash http://hookflash.com.

Come and work at one of the coolest companies in the space! We’re now hiring for these development positions: iOS, Android, Node.js & C++ send us your resume: jobs@hookflash.com.

Hookflash – Trent Johnsen

855-466-5352 Ext: 1

How Telco’s fit into the WebRTC, OTT Communications equation

In recent discussions about Open Peer with analysts and at WebRTC Conferences I have been asked the question; How Telco’s fit into the WebRTC, OTT (over-the-top) Communications equation?

My views on this issue are grounded in economics and history. First, the history. In 2001 I joined a startup defined as a BLEC, (Building Local Exchange Carrier) doing very early work with VoDSL (Voice over DSL over ATM). The business case was that voice services could be delivered more efficiently over broadband connections resulting in enhanced services for customers and profits for the business.

By 2003 our focus on VoDSL was transitioning to a “new” protocol, VoIP (Voice over IP). I have distinct memories of countless meetings with Telco engineers and executives along with analyst and industry articles basically singing the same tune – VoIP is a geek’s technology, it will never be ready for prime time, will never be successfully commercialized. This is blood in the water to an entrepreneur’s shark instinct and we, along with other early players such as Vonage and Skype, and many of today’s most successful telecom equipment providers, went all in on VoIP. Today, VoIP and SIP are key Telco technology standards, now that they’ve been validated by early stage, risk takers. That leads me to the economics part of the response.

VoIP has been successfully adopted over the past decade simply because it has proven a better, less expensive way of delivering voice services. The early validation of VoIP by players like Skype, Vonage and a host of others doesn’t necessarily mean those guys were smarter than the Telco’s. It means they were operating under different management responsibilities and risk/reward paradigms. The executive management and boards of Telcos are hired and paid NOT to take risks. They run utilities owned by pension funds and are tasked to provide reasonable, conservative returns with as little risk as possible. They are not paid to innovate. That’s the domain of the other end of the risk/reward spectrum, startups and entrepreneurs.

So, How will Telco’s fit into the WebRTC, OTT Communications equation? History and economics indicate that they will ultimately embrace WebRTC and OTT completely.  How do we know? Skype, the king of OTT communications today was once a geek’s technology and WebRTC obviously is today, but, WebRTC and OTT clearly provide enhanced services at reduced costs, quite simply, a better, easier, less expensive way of doing things. Economic history clearly indicates technology with these attributes succeeds and is widely adopted. The Open Peer software we build at our small, young technology company, Hookflash,  provides higher quality HD video, and wideband audio sessions over reasonable quality broadband connections (wireline or wireless) than PSTN/equipment based solutions, at a tiny fraction of the cost. It also takes a unique new approach to web identity and connecting on IP networks, see Identity Federation.

Open Peer software also directly integrates with other software and applications including enterprise directories, social media, ERP and CRM which will add untold value in productivity, and eliminate the ongoing need and costs associated with PSTN connections and telecom equipment infrastructure. (And yes, it’s shortsighted to ask, what about features like voice mail or ACD?) Messaging is the new ringtone and exciting new features will emerge in Real-Time Communications via WebRTC and mobile to replace other traditional telephony features as computers in their various forms, smartphones, tablets and desktops (and even televisions) continue to replace telephones.

Progressive Telco’s are already launching OTT services such as Telefonica’s O2 Tu Go and British Telecoms’ SmartTalk. UK Analysts Vision Mobile produced an excellent White Paper (sponsored by Ericsson) on Telco strategy for OTT: The Telco Innovation Toolbox.

How Telco’s ultimately fit remains to be seen but here’s my take:

– the majority of communications will migrate to OTT, (essentially meaning all IP) due to superior economics and manageability – telcos will be swept along

– Many Telco’s may wind up positioned one layer back from most customer/subscribers finding their optimal opportunities in providing critical broadband capacity and quality for the growth of OTT and WebRTC services in an all IP era.

–  adoption of OTT and WebRTC will happen more rapidly than VoIP did as customer adoption cycles continue to shorten replacing today’s hybrid IP/PSTN connectivity with all IP solutions. Microsoft Lync is a good example of this kind of temporary hybrid solution. I’d suggest Oracle’s recent $2 billion investment in Acme Packet is a leading indicator of the integration that will occur in an all IP communications marketplace.

– Telco’s will ultimately focus on their competitive advantage as infrastructure providers and benefit as growth in over-the-top services drives bandwidth demand

Telco topline revenue may decline as they transition from traditional subscriber revenues but margins and business stability will improve as Telcos provide enhanced broadband services including speed, capacity, Quality of Service, and security. Telco’s will thrive providing the foundational backbone for OTT services and WebRTC in the new growth era of integrated real-time communications on the web.

 


by Trent Johnsen