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Next Event: @RobinRaymond of Hookflash speaking @IIT_RTC_Conf #webrtc #ortc

IIT RTC Conference

This is hands down our favorite event of the year. IIT has produced a great “no bs” technical event. If you want to know what is happening inside the industry, you will want to attend this one. Excerpt from their website..

The IIT RTC Conference and Expo is a globally recognized collaborative event, where industry and academia connect. Leveraging its unique academic setting, this annual conference brings together technical professionals and business executives from the data and telecommunications industry, standards bodies, policy and regulatory institutions, and academic educators and researchers to promote an open exchange of ideas to lead future development in the rapidly changing field of real-time communications.

Robin Raymond will be speaking on a few topics:

  • Future of the Cloud with P2P (Peer-to-Peer) RTC (Real-Time Communication)
  • ORTC (Object Real-Time Communications) API Update
  • Delivering Real-Time Communications with Mobile

IIT RTC Conference Schedule: http://www.rtc-conference.com/conference-schedule-listings/

Hookflash, Google and Microsoft lead on ORTC / WebRTC 1.1 Public Draft

webrtc1.1_logo

The first ORTC Public Draft Specification has been published, authored by Hookflash, Microsoft, and Google. (http://ortc.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/ortc.html ) This specification extends WebRTC 1.0 with new functionality to create a WebRTC 1.1 API with exceptional flexibility and no loss of compatibility.

Like WebRTC, ORTC (Object Real-time Communication) enables plugin-free real-time communications for mobile, web and cloud, but is specifically tailored to provide the direct control needed to enable advanced multimedia and conferencing features.

“We heard developers say that they wanted more direct control over the technologies available in WebRTC. At the same time, we didn’t want existing developers to have to start over with a new API. ORTC is our proposal for how we can accomplish both of these things – a new set of APIs for direct control, that builds off the existing WebRTC 1.0 API set. As an evolution of the existing API, we consider this WebRTC 1.1” comments Justin Uberti, Google Tech Lead, WebRTC. “We’re grateful to Hookflash for their work to get ORTC off the ground. They have been instrumental in making this cross-industry collaboration happen, and we look forward to continuing our work with them.”

This newly published public draft has come a long way since the W3C ORTC Community Group was formed in mid-2013. As it has progressed from an initial set of ideas to a fleshed-out draft complete enough for implementations, several companies have gotten closely involved, with Microsoft and Google now joining Hookflash as authors of the emerging specification.

“We have been working hard to get the ORTC API to the point where it can be implemented. This would not have been possible without the initial and continuing work of Hookflash”, commented Bernard Aboba, Principal Architect, Skype, “We also are excited by the ORTC API’s support for advanced video features such as SVC (Scalable Video Coding) and simulcast. The Javascript Object API approach has made these advanced video technologies more accessible, which has been difficult in the past.”

The W3C ORTC Community Group now numbers more than 60 participants.

“We believe the contributions to WebRTC 1.1 / ORTC will allow web communications technology to become ubiquitous and transcend nearly all communications technologies that came before it” says Hookflash Co-founder, Erik Lagerway, “We are honored to be working with some of the brightest minds at Google, Microsoft, and the other contributing members in the ORTC CG to mature WebRTC into a universal go-to toolkit enabling communications across the globe.”

For more information on ORTC, see:
W3C ORTC Community Group
ORTC.org – History and FAQs
WebRTC.is – ORTC & WebRTC news

Hookflash enables real-time social, mobile, and web communications for integration of voice, video, messaging with federated identity into world leading software, enterprise, applications, networks, mobile and computing devices. Hookflash and Open Peer are trademarks of Hookflash Inc.

Developers can register at (http://fly.hookflash.me) to start using the Hookflash RTC service and toolkits today.

For more information on Hookflash RTC toolkits and White Labeling please visit Hookflash http://hookflash.com.

Come and work at one of the coolest companies in the space! We’re now hiring for these development positions: iOS, Android, Node.js & C++ send us your resume: jobs@hookflash.com.

Hookflash – Trent Johnsen

855-466-5352 Ext: 1

Hookflash for Android

hookflash_android_video

 

Today we are shipping our android reference app, sdk and sdk sample app, now in alpha.

Our Hookflash SDK for Android is openly available on Github, today we are releasing a new sample app in code and a Hookflash reference app in the Play Store.

We have run preliminary tests between the iOS app in the iTunes App Store and Android app in the Play Store. Messaging & voice works well, video on iOS has been there for some time now. As you can see from the screenshot video still needs a bit of tweaking on android, as so it has been  temporarily disabled in the reference app.

We are looking forward to working with mobile developers on Android now in addition to iOS. Never has it been so easy to create a scalable mobile messenger with RTC (Real-time Communications) features that other messenger platforms would die for! So come and create something cool! Developers, join up and get started for free today!

Not a developer? No problem, we provide a white label service as well. Send us a note with your project ideas.

ORTC – JavaScript powered RTC

The ORTC API (http://ortc.org) was conceptualized by Robin Raymond – Chief Architect, Hookflash Inc.  It’s no secret that we have been opposed to SDP in the WebRTC 1.0 spec, but instead of derailing progress there we decided to create a W3C Community Group where we could apply our passion. We are getting closer on a Public Draft of that API and when I look at the progress we have made since forming the Community Group a mere 9 months ago, I am satisfied we are moving at a good pace. Our list of participants continues to grow and its great to see ORTC on the list of considered technologies in the Internet Explorer group at Microsoft!

We are hopeful that we make some material progress at this next meeting, I know we are all itching to get this API implementable so we can build ORTC into some cool apps.

The next ORTC Community Group Meeting is scheduled for April 17, 2014 at 10am Pacific. Agenda and meeting details to follow.

Hookflash Advances Enterprise Real-time Communications for Web and Mobile with ORTC

Vancouver BC, Canada (PRWEB) November 01, 2013

Hookflash joins over 20 technology companies and thought leaders from around the globe this Sunday, November 3, 2013, to review “ORTC” the new Object RTC API (Object Real-Time Communications Application Programming Interface). Hookflash Chief Architect Robin Raymond will provide an introduction and overview of the new ORTC API, as well as demos and sample application reviews. This event will be streamed live: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/ortc-live.

“The work that Hookflash is doing on the Object Real-time Communications API (ORTC) positions them at the forefront of WebRTC,” comments Microsoft executive Albert Kooiman, Senior Product Marketing Manager, Lync. “ORTC is a very appealing approach for developers looking to produce interoperable WebRTC applications quickly, by presenting a simpler and more familiar Javascript Object model that leverages the skills of mainstream web developers, instead of the more complex Offer/Answer approach. To see open source code that enables this is real progress. We believe that ORTC (and the establishment of the W3C ORCA Community Group to evolve it) is a major step forward and we support Hookflash in their efforts.”

The W3C Object RTC (ORCA) Community Grouphttp://www.w3.org/community/orca/ was formed in July 2013 to develop an alternative JavaScript API for real-time communications by a group of people looking for alternatives to SDP Offer/Answer in WebRTC. The Community Group published its first draft specification on October 11, 2013.

Hookflash Co-founder, Erik Lagerway explains “Microsoft has expressed concerns regarding the current WebRTC specification. If the current WebRTC specification isn’t included in Internet Explorer, it creates a massive gap in the Enterprise and global marketplace. Hookflash is providing both ORTC, WebRTC and mobile compatibility in Hookflash toolkits to deliver Voice, Video and Messaging without plugins to Internet Explorer (assuming integration of ORTC), Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, iOS and android. This makes Hookflash the first company to fill that gap for Enterprise, developers and consumers. But it doesn’t end there,” says Lagerway, “The optimal solution for web developers and customers will be to have all the browser vendors integrate support for ORTC directly. Since ORTC supports both Object and SDP Offer/Answer models, everyone wins.”

Hookflash will be making another announcement on Sunday during the ORTC Walkthroughhttp://blog.webrtc.is/2013/10/28/ortc-walk-through-ietf-88/, regarding the availability of source code for ORTC/WebRTC implementations. This event will be streamed live: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/ortc-live.

Hookflash enables real-time social, mobile, and web communications with “Open Peer” for integration of voice, video, messaging with federated identity into world leading software, enterprise, applications, networks, mobile and computing devices. Hookflash and Open Peer are trademarks of Hookflash Inc.

Developers can register at (http://fly.hookflash.me) to start using the Open Peer SDKs today.

For more information and an Open Peer/WebRTC White Paper please visit Hookflash http://hookflash.com.

Press Contact: Trent Johnsen
Hookflash
Press(at)hookflash(dot)com
855-HOOKFLASH (466-5352) ext 1

OTT: That’s just over the top!

A 3-hour, executive format meeting where up to 100 telecom experts discuss how Over The Top, OTT, content and services are changing the ecosystem and creating opportunities.

The rise of OTT content and services has been a bittersweet affair for network operators. On the one hand, OTT content is what has driven the demand for mobile data subscriptions which have provided the only growing data source in an era of dropping voice revenues. OTOH, OTT content soaks up most of the networks capacity, and increases CapEx and OpEx for carriers.

Making matters worse, network operators are being cut out of “owning” the customer relationship, being the provider of new services, and building churn-reducing loyalty. Resistance is mostly futile, so entrenched players need to select, partner, and compete. Companies are looking for areas they can be a top player, and compete to win a portion of the OTT business. Partnerships are key to this strategy, so in today’s meeting, we will examine strategies such as that of Telefónica Digital, look at a variety of potential operator partners like Cloudscaling, and look at carrier-consortium efforts such as Joyn. We’re going to examine this from both a mobile and fixed perspective.

We will be there, will you?

Watch This: @RobinRaymond builds federated video chat at jQuery Conference Portland on stage!

This is a great visualization of how WebRTC actually functions today.  Robin shows the message flows in a terminal, the source used, very cool! He also touches on all the bits outside of WebRTC that are needed for a secure, ubiquitous and mobile friendly user experience.

The Q&A at the end of the presentation are worth listening to as well.

The demo code used: https://github.com/openpeer/webrtc-demo

Presentation: https://github.com/openpeer/pres-jqueryconf-2013

Rolodex for Identities Mgt: https://github.com/openpeer/rolodex

Rolodex Presence – Plug-in: https://github.com/openpeer/rolodex-presence

When will WebRTC be ready for prime time?

No matter what camp you are in, pro-SDP or Object API, WebRTC feels like it’s here to stay. The fact that there is so much push-back on an Object-centric API in the WebRTC working groups tells us that there are many who are concerned about delaying v1 any longer than is necessary, there is a feeling of urgency, which seems like a good thing.

As an application developer, one looks at the current state of WebRTC as a proposed standard and it soon becomes apparent that it is not trivial. Building a commercially viable application or service will take much more than a few JavaScript APIs leveraging the WebRTC stack in Chrome and Firefox.

WebRTC is in its early infancy, building a commercial service using WebRTC in the browser today is not only unlikely it might even be a little silly. That’s not to say that the work being done in and around WebRTC today isn’t valid, far from it. It’s just that WebRTC “in browsers” is far from being ready for any service to deploy commercially and scale.

Where are we most likely to see traction early on?

What WebRTC, or specifically Google, has given us is a great media stack that we can leverage in apps.

Mobile is where WebRTC can be put to work easily and quickly. Any iOS, android or even BB10 application developer can now make use of new mobile developer toolkits that include the WebRTC media stack plus other features like social identity federation, p2p signaling and the like. Mobile is where WebRTC technology shines today.

Building for mobile first is not just convenient it’s smart. By building on mobile ahead of the browsers the developer somewhat “future proofs” the life cycle of the product being developed. When WebRTC is ready for prime time, those mobile developers will be in a perfect position to deploy to the browser, potentially edging out their competition.

When will the browsers be ready?

It’s going to be the better part of a year (some say years) before some of the hard problems are solved in the respective WebRTC working groups and even then the v1 features supported will be somewhat minimal. Even I thought this would have been done by now, but we are a long way from done.

Questions remain unanswered:  Where is Apple? What will Microsoft do with CU-RTC-Web?  What video codec will be chosen as MTI?

Regardless of how much work there is left to do, the bureaucracy and politics inherent in the standards bodies will ensure that we will not see this in production across all major browsers anytime soon.

As an example, let’s take a look at XMPP. Before it became a standard XMPP was the Jabber protocol, an open technology used primarily for instant messaging and presence. Since Jabber was already defined and deployed heavily all across the globe you would think the standardization would go rather quickly, right? Nope. That process took more than 2 years in the IETF and very little was changed.

If you are a mobile developer looking to leverage WebRTC for a mobile project, you’re in luck! There are some good mobile SDKs available today.  You might want to hold off on deployment plans for all the major browsers anytime soon, especially not if you are focusing your efforts in the Enterprise markets where MS Windows and Internet Explorer still rule the roost.